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Download Full Movie John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017)

John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) HD

Director : Chad Stahelski.
Producer : Basil Iwanyk.
Release : February 8, 2017
Country : United States of America.
Production Company : Thunder Road Pictures, LionsGate, 87Eleven.
Language : English, Italiano.
Runtime : 122 min.
Genre : Thriller, Action, Crime.

Movie ‘John Wick: Chapter 2’ was released in February 8, 2017 in genre Thriller. Chad Stahelski was directed this movie and starring by Keanu Reeves. This movie tell story about John Wick is forced out of retirement by a former associate looking to seize control of a shadowy international assassins’ guild. Bound by a blood oath to aid him, Wick travels to Rome and does battle against some of the world’s most dangerous killers.

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Malaria deaths fall 20% worldwide in last decade

BBC News – Malaria deaths fall over 20% worldwide in last decade.

There has been a fall of just over 20% in the number of deaths from malaria worldwide in the past decade, the World Health Organization says.

A new report said that one-third of the 108 countries where malaria was endemic were on course to eradicate the disease within 10 years.

Experts said if targets continued to be met, a further three million lives could be saved by 2015.

Malaria is one of the deadliest global diseases, particularly in Africa.

In 2009, 781,000 people died from malaria. The mosquito-borne disease is most prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, where 85% of deaths occurred, most of them children under five.

An earlier report here incorrectly referred to a 40% drop in deaths.

It has been eradicated from three countries since 2007 – Morocco, Turkmenistan and Armenia.

The Roll Back Malaria Partnership aims to eliminate malaria in another eight to 10 countries by the end of 2015, including the entire WHO European Region.

Malaria Factfile

  • 2000: 233 million cases, 985,000 deaths
  • 2009: 225 million cases, 781,000 deaths
  • Malaria present in 108 countries and territories
  • 1.3% GDP reduction in heavily-infected countries

Robert Newman, director of the WHO’s Global Malaria Programme, said “remarkable progress” had been made.

“Better diagnostic testing and surveillance has provided a clearer picture of where we are on the ground – and has shown that there are countries eliminating malaria in all endemic regions of the world,” he told an international Malaria Forum conference in Seattle.

“We know that we can save lives with today’s tools.”

Global eradication

Graphic: Global Malaria deaths 2000-09

A global malaria eradication campaign, launched by WHO in 1955, succeeded in eliminating the disease in 16 countries and territories.

But after less than two decades, the WHO decided to concentrate instead on the less ambitious goal of malaria control.

However, another eight nations were declared malaria-free up until 1987, when certification was abandoned for 20 years.

In recent years, interest in malaria eradication as a long-term goal has re-emerged.

The WHO estimates that malaria causes significant economic losses, and can decrease gross domestic product (GDP) by as much as 1.3% in countries with high levels of transmission.

In the worst-affected countries, the disease accounts for: Up to 40% of public health expenditures; 30% to 50% of inpatient hospital admissions; and up to 60% of outpatient health clinic visits.

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Watch Full Movie Online And Download Logan (2017)

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Quality: HD
Title : Logan
Release : 2017-02-28.
Language : English.
Runtime : 141 min.
Genre : Action, Drama, Science Fiction.
Stars : Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Dafne Keen, Boyd Holbrook, Stephen Merchant, Elizabeth Rodriguez.

In the near future, a weary Logan cares for an ailing Professor X in a hide out on the Mexican border. But Logan’s attempts to hide from the world and his legacy are up-ended when a young mutant arrives, being pursued by dark forces.

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Climate change set to increase ozone-related deaths over next 60 years, scientists warn

Climate change set to increase ozone-related deaths over next 60 years, scientists warn.

ScienceDaily (Sep. 27, 2011) — Scientists are warning that death rates linked to climate change will increase in several European countries over the next 60 yrs.

A new study, which is being presented at the European Respiratory Society’s Annual Congress in Amsterdam, predicts that Belgium, France, Spain and Portugal will see the biggest climate-induced increase in ozone-related deaths over the next 60 years.

The research is part of the Climate-TRAP project and its health impact assessment lead by Prof Bertil Forsberg from the Umea University in Sweden. The aim is to prepare the health sector for changing public health needs due to climate change.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), climate change that has occurred since the 1970s caused over 140,000 excess deaths annually by the year 2004. In addition to its impact on clean air, drinking water and crop production, many deadly diseases such as malaria and those which cause diarrhea are particularly sensitive to climate change.

In this new research, the scientists used emission scenarios and models to assess the health impacts of a changing climate. They took projections from two greenhouse gas emission scenarios, A2 and A1B, and two global climate models, ECHAM4 and HADLEY, to simulate how the various future ozone levels are affected by climate change.

They compared four periods: baseline period (1961-1990); the current situation (1990-2009); nearer future (2012-2050); and further future (2041-2060).

The findings revealed that since 1961, Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands and the UK have seen the biggest impact on ozone-related deaths due to climate change. The results predicted that the biggest increase over the next 50 yrs is likely to be seen in Belgium, France, Spain and Portugal, who could expect an increase of between 10 and 14%. However, Nordic and Baltic countries are predicted to see a decrease over the same period.

Dr Hans Orru, air pollution expert from the Umea University and University of Tartu in Estonia, explains: “Ozone is a highly oxidative pollutant, linked with hospitalisations and deaths due to problems with the respiratory system. Ground-level ozone formation is due to rise as temperatures increase with climate change. The results of our study have shown the potential effects that climate change can have on ozone levels and how this change will impact upon the health of Europeans.”

Professor Marc Decramer, President of the ERS, said: “Outdoor air pollution is the biggest environmental threat in Europe. If we do not act to reduce levels of ozone and other pollutants, we will see increased hospital admissions, extra medication and millions of lost working days. As part of the European Respiratory Roadmap, which was launched last month, the ERS is calling for a collaborative approach between health professionals and policy makers, to protect vulnerable populations from the damaging effects air pollutants can have.”

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by European Lung Foundation, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.


 

Poisoned school lunch kills Peru children

BBC News – Poisoned school lunch kills Peru children.

Three children have died and more than 50 others are seriously ill in Peru after eating a school meal contaminated with pesticide, officials say.

The children were being fed by a government nutrition programme for the poor, at a remote mountain village in the north of the country.

It is thought the meal of rice and fish was prepared in a container which may have previously held rat poison.

At least three adults have also been taken ill.

The mass poisoning happened in the village of Redondo in the Cajamarca region, about 750km (470 miles) north of the capital, Lima.

The three dead were between six and 10 years old.

The food had been donated by the National Food Assistance Programme, which gives food to schools in the poorest parts of the country.

The mother of one of the children who died said they showed signs of having been poisoned.

“I think it was poison because all the kids are purple, from all parts of the school,” said the mother, who was not named.

“My little boy has died. My nine-year-old boy, Miguel Angel, has died.”

Peruvian health official Miguel Zumaeta said the incident “looks like it was a carbonates intoxication, which means rat poison”.

Prosecutors and health ministry officials are investigating how the meal became tainted.

In a similar case in 1999, 24 children died in a village near Cusco in southern Peru after eating food contaminated by pesticide.

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World population to surpass 7 billion in 2011

World population to surpass 7 billion in 2011; Explosive population growth means challenges for developing nations.

ScienceDaily (July 28, 2011) — Global population is expected to hit 7 billion later this year, up from 6 billion in 1999. Between now and 2050, an estimated 2.3 billion more people will be added — nearly as many as inhabited the planet as recently as 1950. New estimates from the Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations also project that the population will reach 10.1 billion in 2100.

These sizable increases represent an unprecedented global demographic upheaval, according to David Bloom, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography at the Harvard School of Public Health, in a review article published July 29, 2011 in Science.

Over the next forty years, nearly all (97%) of the 2.3 billion projected increase will be in the less developed regions, with nearly half (49%) in Africa. By contrast, the populations of more developed countries will remain flat, but will age, with fewer working-age adults to support retirees living on social pensions.

“Although the issues immediately confronting developing countries are different from those facing the rich countries, in a globalized world demographic challenges anywhere are demographic challenges everywhere,” said Bloom.

The world’s population has grown slowly for most of human history. It took until 1800 for the population to hit 1 billion. However, in the past half-century, population jumped from 3 to 7 million. In 2011, approximately 135 million people will be born and 57 million will die, a net increase of 78 million people.

Considerable uncertainty about these projections remains, Bloom writes. Depending on whether the number of births per woman continues to decline, the ranges for 2050 vary from 8.1 to 10.6 billion, and the 2100 projections vary from 6.2 to 15.8 billion.

Population trends indicate a shift in the “demographic center of gravity” from more to less developed regions, Bloom writes. Already strained, many developing countries will likely face tremendous difficulties in supplying food, water, housing, and energy to their growing populations, with repercussions for health, security, and economic growth.

“The demographic picture is indeed complex, and poses some formidable challenges,” Bloom said. “Those challenges are not insurmountable, but we cannot deal with them by sticking our heads in the sand. We have to tackle some tough issues ranging from the unmet need for contraception among hundreds of millions of women and the huge knowledge-action gaps we see in the area of child survival, to the reform of retirement policy and the development of global immigration policy. It’s just plain irresponsible to sit by idly while humankind experiences full force the perils of demographic change.”

Dry onion skin a treasure we're tossing out?

Dry onion skin has a use.

ScienceDaily (July 14, 2011) — More than 500,000 tonnes of onion waste are thrown away in the European Union each year. However, scientists say this could have a use as food ingredients. The brown skin and external layers are rich in fibre and flavonoids, while the discarded bulbs contain sulphurous compounds and fructans. All of these substances are beneficial to health.

Production of onion waste has risen over recent years in line with the growing demand for these bulbs. More than 500,000 tonnes of waste are generated in the European Union each year, above all in Spain, Holland and the United Kingdom, where it has become an environmental problem. The waste includes the dry brown skin, the outer layers, roots and stalks, as well as onions that are not big enough to be of commercial use, or onions that are damaged.

“One solution could be to use onion waste as a natural source of ingredients with high functional value, because this vegetable is rich in compounds that provide benefits for human health,” says Vanesa Benítez, a researcher at the Department of Agricultural Chemistry at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain).

Benítez’s research group worked with scientists from Cranfield University (United Kingdom) to carry out laboratory experiments to identify the substances and possible uses of each part of the onion. The results have been published in the journal Plant Foods for Human Nutrition.

According to the study, the brown skin could be used as a functional ingredient high in dietary fibre (principally the non-soluble type) and phenolic compounds, such as quercetin and other flavonoids (plant metabolites with medicinal properties). The two outer fleshy layers of the onion also contain fibre and flavonoids.

“Eating fibre reduces the risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal complaints, colon cancer, type-2 diabetes and obesity,” the researcher points out.

Phenolic compounds, meanwhile, help to prevent coronary disease and have anti-carcinogenic properties. The high levels of these compounds in the dry skin and the outer layers of the bulbs also give them high antioxidant capacity.

Meanwhile, the researchers suggest using the internal parts and whole onions that are thrown away as a source of fructans and sulphurous compounds. Fructans are prebiotics, in other words they have beneficial health effects as they selectively stimulate the growth and activity of bacteria in the colon.

Sulphurous compounds reduce the accumulation of platelets, improving blood flow and cardiovascular health in general. They also have a positive effect on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory systems in mammals.

“The results show that it would be useful to separate the different parts of onions produced during the industrial process,” explains Benítez. “This would enable them to be used as a source of functional compounds to be added to other foodstuffs.”

America's flesh-eating cocaine problem

America’s flesh-eating cocaine problem – The Week.

Parents have long warned that drugs will fry your brain. Now doctors say cocaine might also rot your skin — literally

Cocaine users may be snorting a flesh-eating drug; 82 percent of street cocaine is laced with a veterinary drug used to deworm animals, according to a new study.

Cocaine users may be snorting a flesh-eating drug; 82 percent of street cocaine is laced with a veterinary drug used to deworm animals, according to a new study. Photo: Scott Gibson/Corbis SEE ALL 14 PHOTOS

It’s no secret that cocaine can be dangerous, but drug dealers might be making it more harmful than ever. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration recently reported that 82 percent of the cocaine it seizes has been cut with a veterinary drug that can rot away the skin on users’ noses, cheeks, and ears. “It’s probably quite a big problem,” says dermatologist Dr. Noah Craft with the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Insitute. “We just don’t know how big.” Here, a brief guide:

How does levamisole end up in cocaine?
Drug dealers typically add fillers to cocaine to boost their profits. Cheaper cocaine may be upwards of 90 percent filler. Sometimes, the added powder is just baking soda or some other innocuous substance. But drug cartels in South America increasingly prefer to use levamisole, a veterinary antibiotic normally used to deworm cattle, sheep, and pigs. It’s not clear why dealers don’t just use baking soda all the time, although studies in rats suggest that levamisole might tingle brain receptors in the same way cocaine does. If that’s the case, adding it to the supply might be a way to enhance the effects of cocaine on the cheap.

And the user ends up paying the price?
Yes, in some cases, says Craft, who has published a case study in Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. Craft linked six patients with patches of dying flesh to tainted cocaine. The wounds typically surface a day after exposure due to an immune reaction that damages blood vessels supplying the skin. Without any blood supply, the skin is starved of oxygen, turns a dark purple, and dies off. While the contamination of the cocaine supply is widespread, not all of those using cocaine experience this adverse reaction. But, anyone who uses cocaine is at risk, Craft says. “Rich or poor, black or white.”

Are doctors just discovering this problem?
No, levamisole has been on the radar screen of drug-prevention officials and doctors for a while. In 2009, there were reports of a handful of cocaine users in Canada developing hepatitis C and anemia after using cocaine mixed with levamisole. The killer agent hinders a person’s ability to produce white blood cells, which are essential for fighting off sometimes deadly infections. But the DEA’s report on the extent of the contamination, explains why some doctors are now seeing gruesome wounds linked to recent cocaine use. “It’s important for people to know it’s not just in New York and L.A.,” says Craft. “It’s in the cocaine supply of the entire U.S.”

Climate Change Extends Allergy Season in North America

Climate Change Extends Allergy Season in North America: Scientific American.

Bad news for—achoo!—those who sniffle, er suffer their way through ragweed—sniff, snort, itch—season: A team of researchers has found that increased warming, particularly in the northern half of North America, has added weeks to the fall pollen season.

It’s enough to make you grab a tissue: Minneapolis has tacked 16 days to the ragweed pollen season since 1995; LaCrosse, Wisc. has added 13 days, Winnipeg and Saskatoon in Canada have added 25 and 27 days, respectively.

The new research, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, finds the longer pollen seasons correlate with the disproportionate warming happening around the planet and attributed to greenhouse gas emissions.

Upper latitudes are warming faster than mid-latitudes, and the pollen season is lengthening in proportion. Scientists and health officials found no appreciable warming in Texas, Arkansas or Oklahoma.

“It’s not just theoretical,” said Lewis Ziska, the study’s lead author and a plant physiologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s crop system and global change laboratory. “We are seeing a signal based on what in fact the [U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] is predicting.”

The impact goes far beyond mere sniffles and inconvenience. Some 50 million Americans have allergies, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. Of those, 35 million suffer nasal allergies, known broadly as hay fever, said Mike Tringale, the association’s vice president.

For 75 percent of those 35 million, ragweed is the primary allergen, he added.

And in many cases, allergies can trigger a bout of asthma, or make it worse.

Dr. Nancy Ott, a physician with Southdale Pediatrics in Edina, Minn., has seen “a lot more desperate calls” over the past four to six years. “These longer seasons can be a problem” particularly for those with asthma, she said. “I try to get patients in early, make sure they have a red ‘X’ on Feb. 28 or whenever the pollen season starts.”

The findings correlate with analysis last year by the National Wildlife Federation that found ragweed growth rates and pollen counts increased with global warming. In one study, accelerating spring’s arrival by 30 days prompted a 54 percent increase in ragweed pollen production.

The danger with a lengthening season—and perhaps a more intense one—is pollen’s potential to overwhelm immune systems that, up till now, have withstood the onslaught, Tringale said.

Much as water in a bathtub is not a problem until it starts to overflow, pollen for many is not an irritant until it crosses a particular threshold, he said.

“With the longer season, with the creeping breadth of the geographic footprint of the season, and with more powerful plants producing more pollen, it’s a triple threat,” he added. “Now you’ve got yourself a much wider population that could potentially be affected that might not have been affected before.’

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

Douglas Fischer is editor of DailyClimate.org, a nonprofit news service that covers climate change.

Gulf oil spill poses unique health challenges – health – 28 June 2010 – New Scientist

Gulf oil spill poses unique health challenges – health – 28 June 2010 – New Scientist.

Last week public health experts convened in New Orleans, Louisiana, to tackle unanswered questions about the health effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. After the workshop, hosted by the Institute of Medicine, a non-profit organisation within the US National Academies in Washington DC, what do we now know about the health risks?

What are the immediate health hazards of the oil spill?

Exposure to oil can make you sick, but research shows these effects fade over time and are generally reversible. Fumes can irritate the eyes and throat or spur headache, nausea, and flu-like symptoms. Inhaling the dispersants that are being used to get rid of the oil can make you cough as well as cause throat and eye irritation.

Skin contact with oil can cause redness, swelling or rash on the skin. Beach-goers should not swim in areas affected by the spill and avoid touching the oil or spill-affected water.

As temperatures soar along the Gulf coast, heatstroke is also a major concern for clean-up workers – particularly those working outside who are not accustomed to the area’s oppressive temperatures.

What components of the oil are dangerous?

Crude oil contains a number of compounds that are carcinogenic and can alter a person’s DNA. It has a complex chemical profile that constantly evolves as it ages and moves from the deep sea to the shoreline.

“Fresh” oil contains volatile organic compounds such as the carcinogen benzene, which quickly evaporate from the ocean surface. Workers close to the site of the leak could be exposed to these toxins, which at sufficiently high concentrations could be hazardous.

Who is most at risk?

Everyone exposed to the oil is at risk, but there is particularly concern about clean-up workers, especially volunteers, who may have inadequate training. Training and ongoing supervision and reinforcement could help protect such workers, so their rapid recruitment could increase the number who become ill.

According to a report by Propublica, a non-profit investigative news provider based in New York, by 17 June 307 workers had reported illness – more than triple the amount previously reported by BP and the Unified Command, an organisation established to manage response operations for the oil spill, up to 10 June. The rise is due to an increase in workers and a backlog in recording incidents, according to safety officials.

Children are more at risk than adults because their bodies detoxify chemicals less efficiently. Being shorter than adults and therefore nearer the ground, they may also be more likely to breathe in heavier-than-air gas pollution.

Are there any long-term risks?

Little is known about these, because few studies have examined the chronic effects of oil exposure. Blanca Laffon, a public health researcher at the University of Coruña in Spain, has observed DNA changes in people exposed to the 2002 Prestige oil spill off the Galician coast. Her team is currently analysing data from last year to see if these changes persist. Such DNA damage could increase a risk of cancer, she explains, much like exposure to pollution or cigarette smoke.

The Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska showed the far-reaching effects on mental health that oil spills can cause in close-knit coastal communities. Increases in domestic violence, depression and drug abuse are all dangers to Gulf communities that have already endured the devastation of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and the current economic downturn.

The lives of Gulf coast residents are inextricably tied to the water. The oil could do lasting damage to the environment and as a result the livelihoods of residents who depend on it.

Irwin Redlener of the National Commission on Children and Disasters in Washington DC called this burden a toxic stress on the lives of children. “This is way worse than Katrina,” Redlener explained, quoting a 15-year-old local resident: “With the oil spill, we live with uncertainty and most of us are afraid that this place we love will not come back. It will mean the end of our way of life. I don’t know what we’ll do – or how we’ll survive.”

What new health challenges does this spill pose?

This spill is unprecedented in scope and is affecting a region battered by previous disasters. Pre-existing health problems, such as limited access to healthcare and poverty, further complicate this picture. Compared with the rest of the nation, the area already ranks near the bottom in statistics of health outcomes.

Unlike oil spills that have been linked to a single event on a tanker, the Gulf oil spill is continuing. As Paul Lioy, an expert on the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks in public health, explained, every day is “day zero” in terms of controlling exposure.